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Fire Hydrants Tested and Lubed

Fire Hydrants Tested and Lubed

Most of the testing is done at night so there is less disruption to traffic although most cars passing through the rushing water don't slow down and sometimes find themselves hydroplaning for a short distance.

Most of the testing is done at night so there is less disruption to traffic although most cars passing through the rushing water don’t slow down and sometimes find themselves hydroplaning for a short distance.

Rust-colored water bursts from a fire hydrant after it is first opened off Schrock Road as city workers test and lubricate emergency services components. Most of the testing is done at night so there is less disruption to traffic although most cars passing through the rushing water don’t slow down and sometimes find themselves hydroplaning for a short distance.

Almost all the hydrants tested have brackish or rust colored water when first opened because the water puddles above the valve buried deep in the ground.

The workers also clear away obstructions for the main water feed and paint its cover blue.

About The Author

Gary Gardiner

Former newspaper and Associated Press photographer. Instructor at Westerville Center for Photography. Owns SmallTown Stock, the Reasonably Rights Managed stock photo agency. Founder and Director for The American Scene Project, a heritage project dedicated to exhibiting and preserving photography of everyday American life.

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